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Education

Call for Applications: University Pedagogy Course

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Makerere University in collaboration with University of Bergen, Norway; Kyambogo University, Uganda; National Institute of Teacher Education (UNITE); and Western Norway University of Applied Sciences is implementing a Six (6) years NORHED II supported Project titled ‘Capacity Building for Research–Based Teacher Education (CABUTE)’. CABUTE is aimed at enabling Uganda’s successful implementation of the National Teacher Policy, 2019.

One of the activities on the CABUTE project is conducting a series of University Pedagogy Training Courses. The 2022 course shall take place from 10th February to 10th March 2022 on a part-time basis via online learning platforms. The course shall be conducted synchronously (through participating in live online sessions) and asynchronously (through completing online activities). The course shall be conducted by university pedagogy professors from University of Bergen, Makerere University; Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and Kyambogo University.

Please see Download below for details on eligibility and how to apply.

For any clarification please contact

Assoc. Prof. Paul Birevu Muyinda, PhD
Coordinator CABUTE Project at Makerere University
Deputy Principal, College of Education and External Studies
Makerere University
E-mail: (paul.birevu@mak.ac.ug)

NB: WOMEN ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

Education

Minister Kabanda launches training of Ghetto Youth by Mak

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Hon. Hajjat Minsa Kabanda (4th R), Prof. Eria Hisali (4th L), Prof. Masagazi Masaazi (3rd R), Prof. Ronald Bisaso (2nd L) and Dr. Badru Musisi (L) pose for a group photo with other officials at the KGYTEP launch held on 31st January 2023 in the Yusuf Lule Auditorium, Makerere University.

A project aimed at equipping ghetto youth with entrepreneurial skills was on January 31, 2023 launched by the Minister of Kampala City Council Authority, Hon. Hajjat Minsa Kabanda. The training will be conducted by researchers from the College of Education and External Studies led by Dr. Badru Musisi and Dr. Nalugwa Allen.

Dr. Musisi said the training would take twelve (12) weeks after which the trainees would be grouped and given capital and asked to start a business. This business will be monitored by the trainers in an effort to offer guidance where need be. The training will be two-faceted; it will also try to do mindset change by impressing it upon the youth that self-employment is a viable option. “When sending children to school, we think about them being job seekers and not creators. This needs to change,” Dr. Musisi said. 

KGYTEP Co-Principal Investigator, Dr. Badru Musisi speaks at the launch.
KGYTEP Co-Principal Investigator, Dr. Badru Musisi speaks at the launch.

Dr. Musisi said, only 50 youth will be trained in the first phase because of resource constraints. The target, in the long run, is to train 5,000 youth (1,000 from each of the five Divisions in Kampala).

He thanked the government for the funding and the University for the environment conducive to researchers. The project titled ‘Kampala Ghetto Youth Training for Entrepreneurial Promotion (KGYTEP)is funded by the Makerere University Research and Innovations Fund (Mak-RIF). It is hoped that the project will contribute to reduction of unemployment and crime in Kampala’s slum areas.

Hon. Hajjat Minsa Kabanda smiles as she addresses the audience a the launch.
Hon. Hajjat Minsa Kabanda smiles as she addresses the audience a the launch.

Minister Hajjat Kabanda welcomed the training saying, “By 2030, we don’t want to have ghettos in Kampala,” she said. She asked the youth to utilize the opportunity given to them. She reminded the youth that the government had started appreciating the ghetto by appointing 3 RDCs from that area. “Let us use this opportunity to get ourselves and our friends out of the ghetto,” she emphasized. She called on the youth to register and benefit from government programs such as the Parish Development Model and the Emyooga. This she said, however, requires that they have National IDs. She then encouraged them to register so that they can exercise their civic duty of voting for their leaders. She encouraged them to be enterprising, hardworking and avoid crime.

Hajjat Kabanda, who referred to herself as ‘Maama Ghetto’ asked the youth to embrace government’s skilling programs and other such poverty eradication programs.

She thanked the research team and Makerere University for contributing to government projects by trying to create employment for Ugandans. She pledged KCCA’s support to the project and the struggle to move towards a middle income economy.

L-R: Prof. Eria Hisali, Hon. Hajjat Minsa Kabanda and Prof. Fred Masagazi Masaazi at the launch.
L-R: Prof. Eria Hisali, Hon. Hajjat Minsa Kabanda and Prof. Fred Masagazi Masaazi at the launch.

The Principal of the College of Business and Management Sciences, Prof. Eria Hisali, who represented the Vice Chancellor, thanked the Minister for making the time to open the training and also congratulated the research team for undertaking something relevant to society. He thanked the government for the financial support to the university and Mak-RIF for making resources available for the project. Prof. Hisali advised the different agencies to work together to achieve the intended goals. He advised the project team to work with KCCA, Uganda Police, State House and any such organizations with interest in ghetto youth.

Prof. Hisali informed the youth about the new Innovations Hub being established at Makerere University with funding from UNDP.  He advised the youth to utilize the facility which will be an incubation centre for innovative ideas and products.

The 50 Ghetto Youth set to benefit from KGYTEP pose for a group photo with officials at the launch.
The 50 Ghetto Youth set to benefit from KGYTEP pose for a group photo with officials at the launch.

The Deputy Principal of the College of Education and External Studies, Prof. Bisaso Ronald said the strategic direction of the university in the next 10 years calls for community engagements, so it was humbling to see his staff contributing to this goal. “We believe that this training will impact the youth and also significantly change our research models,” he said. He emphasized the need for the trainees to be innovative if they are to succeed in the area of self-employment.  

The Chair Grants Management Committee (GMC) of Mak-RIF, Prof. Fred Masagazi Masaazi, informed the congregation that the fund had changed its focus to commercialization and PhD research. He congratulated the research team and also appreciated the Minister for sparing time to preside over the launch of the training. The government allocates UShs30 billion annually to the Makerere University Research and Innovations Fund.

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Education

EASHESD hosts Prof. Keet Lecture on Critical University Studies

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Principal CEES-Prof. Anthony Muwagga Mugagga (4th R), Deputy Director DRGT-Prof. Julius Kikooma (2nd R), Dr. Jude Ssempebwa (2nd L) and other officials pose for a group photo with Prof. André Keet (3rd R) after the Public Lecture on 27th January 2023 in the Multimedia/E-learning Centre, Frank Kalimuzo Central Teaching Facility, Makerere University.

The East African School of Higher Education Studies and Development (EASHESD) on Friday 27th January 2023 hosted Prof. André Keet, who gave a lecture on Advancing Critical University Studies across Africa.

Prof. Keet is the Research Chair for Critical Studies in Higher Education Transformation (CriSHET) and is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Engagement and Transformation at Nelson Mandela University.

The Principal CEES, Prof. Anthony Muwagga Mugagga represented the Vice Chancellor at the public lecture by Prof. Keet.
The Principal CEES, Prof. Anthony Muwagga Mugagga represented the Vice Chancellor at the public lecture by Prof. Keet.

Critical University Studies (CUS) is an approach to the study of university that critically explores the taken-for-granted assumptions of higher education. The study seeks to examine other ways of addressing issues in the university. “When you critique your institution, you are making it better,” Prof. Keet said.

Prof. Keet said there are divergent traditions and views about CUS. One such tradition says Institutional CUS is founded on the premise of a fundamental change in the ontology of the University from the onset of global neoliberalism in the 1990’s.

Prof. André Keet delivers his lecture on Advancing Critical University Studies across Africa.
Prof. André Keet delivers his lecture on Advancing Critical University Studies across Africa.

There was, according to this view, a time when the University was a utopic space and criticism ought to work towards that realising that utopia once more.

According to Prof. Keet, another ‘tradition’ of critical work in the University can be traced to critical pedagogy, decolonial studies, and critical internationalization studies.  There has always been a critical tradition, one which acknowledges the University was never a utopic space, but always exclusionary and unjust.

Prof. André Keet poses for a group photo with participants at the Makerere@100 Monument after the public lecture.
Prof. André Keet poses for a group photo with participants at the Makerere@100 Monument after the public lecture.

The Abolitionist University Studies scholars argue, therefore, that for CUS to be truly emancipatory and meaningful, these traditions must be acknowledged and built upon.

Prof. Keet has established a network to advance CUS. The network is called CriSHET.

While addressing the participants, the Principal of CEES, Prof. Anthony Muwagga Mugagga, who also represented the Vice Chancellor called on the scholars to crtically think about how we can better our education system. He argued that with the privatization of education in Uganda, we had many universities opening up and with that came many students that are not up to the task and yet universities have to groom these students. He called for critical ways in which this training can be done. “How come our education was able to produce the Kenneth Kaunda, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Nelson Mandela and the like, yet today the people leaving the university are corrupt, selfish individuals? We need to rethink our education,” he said.

Prof. André Keet (L) and Dr. Jude Ssempebwa (R) chat as they take in the sights around the Makerere@100 Monument.
Prof. André Keet (L) and Dr. Jude Ssempebwa (R) chat as they take in the sights around the Makerere@100 Monument.

Dr. Jude Ssempebwa, who organized the public lecture said the topic was important for it allows people to think of new ways to solve challenges within the university and education sector at large.

Brief Profile of Prof André Keet

Prof. Keet currently holds the Research Chair for Critical Studies in Higher Education Transformation (CriSHET) and is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Engagement and Transformation at Nelson Mandela University. He is a former Visiting Professor at the Centre for Race, Education and Decoloniality, Carnegie School of Education, Leeds Beckett University, UK and the 2018 Marsha Lilien Gladstein Visiting Professor of Human Rights at the University of Connecticut.

Prof. Keet served as Director and Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) and on the Commission for Gender Equality, before joining the university sector. Since entering the higher education field, André has held professorial positions at the universities of Pretoria, Fort Hare and Free State. He has been serving as transformation advisor and practitioner in various capacities in the sector.

Prof. Keet’s research and post-graduate supervision focus on radical approaches to the study of higher education, such as critical and abolitionist university studies.

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Education

Memorial Lecture: Nsumba-Lyazi’s unforgettable Legacy

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Mr. George Mutekanga (4th L) is joined by the Principal CAES-Prof. Anthony Muwagga Mugagga (C), Hajjat Zaujja Ndifuna (5th R) and other officials for a group photo at the First Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi Memorial Lecture on 25th January 2023, Yusuf Lule Central Teaching Facility Auditorium, Makerere Univeristy.

He was a great educator, a loving father, very calm despite his level of education, a good listener, a smart guy, punctual, disciplined, religious, social, trustworthy, dependable, cooperative and a great mentor were some of the words used to describe the Late Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi.

Speaker after speaker poured praises on the fallen Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi, a great educationist, to whom many owe their success.

This was during the maiden Memorial Public Lecture in his honour, held on Wednesday 25th January 2023 at the Makerere University Yusuf Lule Central Teaching Facility.

Nsumba-Lyazi is said to have died a contented man in 2022 after 40-years of service to the education sector.

Hajjat Zaujja Ndifuna, Director of Mbogo Schools during her keynote address.
Hajjat Zaujja Ndifuna, Director of Mbogo Schools during her keynote address.

“It takes a lot to raise men and women who are admired and we can stand up and speak about them. If you evaluate yourself, will you have people to celebrate and speak about you when we are gone?” asked Hajjat Zaujja Ndifuna, the Director of Mbogo Schools during her keynote address.

Speaking about Nsumba-Lyazi, Hajjat Zaujja said he always emphasized to people that ‘Our beginnings do not define our future’. Having been born to peasant parents in Mityana, Nsumba-Lyazi rose to the rank of Director Basic and Secondary education. Before serving in that capacity, he served as the Commissioner Private Schools and Institutions, Assistant Commissioner Comprehensive Education, Chairperson Church of Uganda Schools in Uganda, Head teacher Mityana SS and Head of Laity Mityana Diocese.

The public lecture was attended by different dignitaries including; his family members, officials from the Ministry of Education and Sports, Makerere University, different secondary schools among others.

In his speech read to the congregation by Prof. Anthony Muwagga Mugagga, the Vice Chancellor of Makerere University  Prof. Barnabas Nawangwe praised Lyazi as a great Educationist.

“Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi attended Makerere during a period of great political upheaval. Academic and Administrative staff had fled into exile and only a handful remained holding fort; doing their best to ensure that Makerere continued producing graduates despite economic hardships that characterized the period,” he said adding,

“Specifically, the University’s plan 1980-1986 outlined efforts to reintroduce correspondence courses or distance education courses, which included External Degrees. Distance education courses are particularly designed to take the University to the people. This was Makerere’s way of recognizing the challenges at hand and in response, extending the principles and quality of University education to the greater majority of people who are unable to attend full-time courses due to work, financial and other obligations,”

Mr. George Mutekanga and some of the Ministry of Education and Sports officials give a speech.
Mr. George Mutekanga and some of the Ministry of Education and Sports officials give a speech.

This strategic move by the University, he said, could have inspired Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi to pursue a postgraduate diploma in Education immediately after completing his Bachelor of Science to enable him teach Physics and Double Math at Secondary school level.

“Looking back, I think Nsumba-Lyazi was not going to wait for the people to come to the University. He wanted to inspire them even before they embarked on their respective Higher Education journies,” the Vice Chancellor said.

“As one who had witnessed firsthand what his parents’ entrepreneurial skills had helped the family achieve, Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi’s exposure to higher education and science subjects in particular made him an even stronger advocate for the value that education adds to our God-given talents. Education unlocks one’s potential and in so doing, opens many more doors for that talent to shine even brighter”.

It is against this background that Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi was a strong advocate for the competence-based curriculum, and worked hard to ensure that its implementation gains traction before his retirement.

“It is very important that our young men and women graduate with skills and competencies that empower them to make meaningful contributions to society,” he added.

Despite being born to peasant parents, Nsumba-Lyazi according to Speakers broke the chains and became a great person who worked tirelessly to promote private schools not only in Mityana but Uganda as a whole.

“He was passionate about teaching right from his early days, after S.6 he was invited in Mityana to teach fellow students which he took on. He rose through the ranks of a teacher to lead and education institution and finally to the Ministry of Education,” Hajjat Zaujja noted adding,

The children of the Late Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi share about their father.
The children of the Late Robinson Nsumba-Lyazi share about their father.

“His family members described him as a great husband, father, relative who worked towards instilling humility, discipline, respect in everyone that knew him.”

Dr. John Chrysostom Muyingo the State Minister of High Education in a speech read for him by Mr. George Mutekanga, Commissioner of Private Education Institutions, asked the audience to emulate the works of the late Nsumba-Lyazi whom he said gave his best to humanity.

Nsumba-Lyazi, Dr. Muyingo said, walked away from the Ministry with satisfaction that he had done his part.

“We liked the way he did his work, there a number of lessons: our beginnings should not define our destiny,” he said

Nsumba-Lyazi’s services, the Minister noted, were always with a smile that lit up the room.

He is credited for having developed education standards in Mityana and also started the association of Private Academic institutions in an effort to ensure that the schools had a voice and could participate in the decision making at the Ministry of Education and Sports.

Nsumba-Lyazi is said to have loved a quote by Martin Luther King, “If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” He is said to have been moving until his death in 2022.

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