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Publications Arising Directly from THRiVE-2 Funding in 2021

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  1. Milugo TK, Tchouassi DP, Kavishe RA, Dinglasan RR, Torto B. Root exudate chemical cues of an invasive plant modulate oviposition behavior and survivorship of a malaria mosquito vector. Sci Rep. 2021 Jul 20;11(1):14785. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94043-5.PMID: 34285252
  2. Kaaya, R.D., Kajeguka, D.C., Matowo, J.J, Ndaro A.J., Mosha FW, Chilongola J. O. and Kavishe R. A. Predictive markers of transmission in areas with different malaria endemicity in north-eastern Tanzania based on seroprevalence of antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum. BMC Res Notes 14, 404 (2021).
    doi: 10.1186/s13104-021-05818-y
  3. Mosha MV, Msuya SE, Kasagama E, Ayieko P, Todd J, Filteau S.PLoS One. Prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity among primary school children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. 2021 Apr 22;16(4):e0249595. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0249595. eCollection 2021.PMID: 33886578
  4. Mosha MV, Kasagama E, Ayieko P, Todd J, Msuya SE, Grosskurth H, Filteau S. Description and comparison of physical activity from self-reports and accelerometry among primary school children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: a pilot study. AAS Open Res. 2021 May 17;3:40. doi: 10.12688/aasopenres.13118.4.eCollection 2020.PMID: 34056542
  5. Mcharo RD, Mayaud P, Msuya SE. Where and how do young people like to get their sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information? Experiences from students in higher learning institutions in Mbeya, Tanzania: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health. 2021 Sep 16;21(1):1683. doi: 10.1186/s12889-021-11728-2.PMID: 34530796
  6. Okello E, Ndagire E, Muhamed B, Sarnacki R, Murali M, Pulle J, Atala J, Bowen AC, DiFazio MP, Nakitto MG, Harik NS, Kansiime R, Longenecker CT, Lwabi P, Agaba C, Norton SA, Omara IO, Oyella LM, Parks T, Rwebembera J, Spurney CF, Stein E, Tochen L, Watkins D, Zimmerman M, Carapetis JR, Sable CA, Beaton A. Incidence of acute rheumatic fever in northern and western Uganda: a prospective, population-based study. Lancet Glob Health. 2021 Oct;9(10):e1423-e1430. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X (21)00288-6. Epub 2021 Aug 19. PMID: 34419237
  7. Beaton A, Okello E, Rwebembera J, Grobler A, Engelman D, Alepere J, Canales L, Carapetis J, DeWyer A, Lwabi P, Mirabel M, Mocumbi AO, Murali M, Nakitto M, Ndagire E, Nunes M, Omara IO, Sarnacki R, Scheel A, Wilson N, Zimmerman M, Zühlke L, Karthikeyan G, Sable CA, Steer AC. Secondary Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Latent Rheumatic Heart Disease. Accepted, NEJM, 8/24/21.
  8. Arthur Kwizera, David P Kateete, Ronald Ssenyonga, Lydia Nakiyingi, Jane Nakibuuka, Christine Namata, Arthur Mwanje, Emmy Okello, Daphne Kabatoro, Noah Kiwanuka, Robert C Bollinger, James Tumwine, Charlotte Summers. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in an African Intensive Care Unit Setting: A Prospective Study of Prevalence and Outcomes. Ann Am Thorac Soc 2021 Oct 19. doi: 10.1513/ AnnalsATS.202103-270RL.
  9. Christine Oryema, Karlmax Rutaro, Sam William Oyet and Geoffrey Maxwell Malinga. Ethnobotanical plants used in the management of symptoms of tuberculosis in rural Uganda Tropical Medicine and Health (2021) 49:92 https://doi.org/10.1186/s41182-021-00384-2
  10. Mulugeta Belay, Begna Tulu, Sidra Younis, David A Jolliffe, Dawit Tayachew, Hana Manwandu, Tenagnework Abozen, Emawayish A Tirfie, Metasebia Tegegn, Aboma Zewude, Sally Forrest, Jonathan Mayito, Jim F Huggett, Gerwyn M Jones, Denise M O’Sullivan, Henny M Martineau, Mahdad Noursadeghi, Aneesh Chandran, Kathryn A Harris, Vlad Nikolayevskyy, Julie Demaret, Stefan Berg, Martin Vordermeier, Taye T Balcha, Abraham Aseffa, Gobena Ameni, Markos Abebe, Stephen T Reece, Adrian R Martineau. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in CD34-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells of asymptomatic tuberculosis contacts: an observational study. The Lancet Microbe, 2021 Jun. 2(6): p. E267-E275.
  1. Mosha MV, Kasagama E, Ayieko P, Todd J, Msuya SE, Grosskurth H Fulteau S.. Description and comparison of physical activity from self-reports and accelerometry among primary school children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: a pilot study [version 4; peer review: 2 approved]. AAS Open Res 2021, 3:40 (https://doi.org/10.12688/aasopenres.13118.4)
  2. Philemon RN , Mmbaga BT , Bartlett J, Renju J, Mtuy T, Mboya IB , Msuya SE. Do Women Enrolled in PMTCT Understand the Recommendations: A Case Study from Kilimanjaro 16 June 2021 Volume 2021:15 Pages 1301—1309 DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S307847
  3. Okello E, Ndagire E, Muhamed B, Sarnacki R, Murali M, Pulle J, Atala J, Bowen AC, DiFazio MP, Nakitto MG, Harik NS, Kansiime R, Longenecker CT, Lwabi P, Agaba C, Norton SA, Omara IO, Oyella LM, Parks T, Rwebembera J, Spurney CF, Stein E, Tochen L, Watkins D, Zimmerman M, Carapetis JR, Sable CA, Beaton A. Incidence of acute rheumatic fever in northern and western Uganda: a prospective, population-based study. Lancet Glob Health. 2021 Oct;9(10):e1423-e1430. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(21)00288-6. Epub 2021 Aug 19. PMID: 34419237
  4. Joel L. Bargul, Kevin O. Kidambasi, Merid N. Getahun, Jandouwe Villinger, Robert S. Copeland, Jackson M. Muema, Mark Carrington, Daniel K. Masiga. Transmission of ‘Candidatus Anaplasma camelii’ to mice and rabbits by camelspecific keds, Hippobosca camelina. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 15(8): e0009671. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0009671
  5. Hudson Onen, Robinson Odong, Moses Chemurot, Frédéric Tripet and Jonathan K. Kayondo Predatory and competitive interaction in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato larval breeding habitats in selected villages of central Uganda. Parasites Vectors (2021) 14:420 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-021-04926-9
  6. Dinah Amongin, Frank Kaharuza, Claudia Hanson, Annettee Nakimuli, Susan Mutesi, Lenka Benova and Lynn Atuyambe. “… I would have left that man long time ago but, …” exploring circumstances of and motivators for repeat adolescent birth in Eastern Uganda. Archives of Public Health (2021) 79:142
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s13690-021-00662-9
  7. TK. Milugo, D P. Tchouassi, RA. Kavishe, RR. Dinglasan & B. Torto. Root exudate chemical cues of an invasive plant modulate oviposition behavior and survivorship of a malaria mosquito vector Nature Portfolio Scientific Reports | (2021) 11:14785 | https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94043-5
  8. Getange, D.; Bargul, J.L.; Kanduma, E.; Collins, M.; Bodha, B.; Denge, D.; Chiuya, T.; Githaka, N.; Younan, M.; Fèvre, E.M.; et al. Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens Associated with Dromedary Camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Northern Kenya. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1414. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071414
  1. Dacal E, Bermejo-Peláez D, Lin L, Álamo E, Cuadrado D, Martínez Á, Mousa A, Postigo M, Soto A, Sukosd E, Vladimirov A, Mwandawiro C, Gichuki P, Williams NA, Muñoz J, Kepha S, Luengo-Oroz M. Mobile microscopy and telemedicine platform assisted by deep learning for the quantification of Trichuris trichiura infection. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2021 Sep 7;15(9):e0009677. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0009677. PMID: 34492039; PMCID: PMC8448303
  2. JM Muema, JL Bargul, JM Mutunga, MA. Obonyo, GO. Asudi, SN Njeru. Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, Neurotoxic Zanthoxylum chalybeum root constituents invoke mosquito larval growth retardation through ecdysteroidogenic CYP450s transcriptional perturbations https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pestbp.2021.104912
  3. Nakanjako D, Kendall D, Sewankambo NK, Razak M H, Oduor B, Odero T, Garcia P, Farquhar C. Building and Sustaining Effective Partnerships for Training the Next Generation of Global Health Leaders. Annals of Global Health. 2021; 87(1): 66, 1–9. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/aogh.3214
  4. Mosha MV, Msuya SE, Kasagama E, Ayieko P, Todd J, Filteau S (2021) Prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity among primary school children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. PLoS ONE 16(4): e0249595. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0249595
  5. Tushabe P, Howard W, Bwogi J, Birungi M, Eliku JP, Kakooza P, Bukenya H, Namuwulya P, Gaizi J, Tibanagwa M, Kabaliisa T, Mulindwa J, Muhanguzi D, Suchard M, Gumede N, Bakamutumaho B.J. Molecular characterization of non-polio enteroviruses isolated from acute flaccid paralysis patients in Uganda. Med Virol. 2021 Jan 17. doi: 10.1002/jmv.26804. Online ahead of print. PMID: 33458840
  6. Martin Mbonye, Godfrey Siu & Janet Seeley (2021) Conflicted masculinities: understanding dilemmas and (re)configurations of masculinity among men in long-term relationships with female sex workers, in Kampala, Uganda, Culture, Health & Sexuality. DOI: 10.1080/13691058.2021.1891569
  7. Atuhairwe S, Gemzell-Danielsson K, Byamugisha J, Kaharuza F, Tumwesigye NM, Hanson C. Abortion-related nearmiss morbidity and mortality in 43 health facilities with differences in readiness to provide abortion care in Uganda. BMJ Glob Health. 2021 Feb;6(2):e003274. doi: 10.1136/bmjgh-2020-003274.PMID: 33547174
  8. Bagasha P, Namukwaya E, Leng M, Kalyesubula R, Mutebi E, Naitala R, Katabira E and Petrova M. Comparison of the healthrelated quality of life of end stage kidney disease patients on hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis management in Uganda. Bagasha et al. BMC Palliative Care (2021) 20:52 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-021-00743-0
  1. Kwizera R, Katende A, Bongomin F, Nakiyingi L and Bruce J. Kirenga. J Misdiagnosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis as pulmonary tuberculosis at a tertiary care center in Uganda: a case series. Med Case Reports (2021) 15:140 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-021-02721-9
  2. Nattoh G, Bargul JL, Magoma G, Mbaisi, L, Butungi H, Mararo E, E Teal, JK Herren (2021) The fungus Leptosphaerulina persists in Anopheles gambiae and induces melanization. PLoS ONE 16(2): e0246452. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0246452
  3. D. Abera, CK Kibet, T Degefa, L Amenga‑Etego, JL Bargul, and L Golassa. Genomic analysis reveals independent evolution of Plasmodium falciparum populations in Ethiopia Malar J (2021) 20:129 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12936-021-03660-y
  4. Richard Kwizera, Emmanuel Mande, Denis Omali, Samuel Okurut, Sheila Nabweyambo, Rose Nabatanzi, Damalie Nakanjako and David B. Meya. Translational research in Uganda: linking basic science to bedside medicine in a resource limited setting. J Transl Med (2021) 19:76 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12967-021-02747-z
  5. Amongin D, Kågesten A, Tunçalp Ö, Nakafeero M, Atuyambe L, Hanson C, Benova L. Later life outcomes of women by adolescent birth history: analysis of the 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey. BMJ Open 2021;11:e041545. doi:10.1136/ bmjopen-2020-041545
  6. Atuhairwe S, Gemzell-Danielsson K, Byamugisha J, et al. Abortion- related near-miss morbidity and mortality in 43 health facilities with differences in readiness to provide abortion care in Uganda. BMJ Global Health 2021;6:e003274. doi:10.1136/ bmjgh-2020-003274
  7. Milugo TK, Tchouassi DP, Kavishe RA, Dinglasan RR, Torto B. Derivatization increases mosquito larvicidal activity of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenin isolated from the invasive weed Parthenium hysterophorus. Pest Manag Sci. 2021 Feb;77(2):659-665. doi: 10.1002/ps.6131. Epub 2020 Oct 26.PMID: 33034953

Read more in the THRiVE Newsletter Oct-Dec 2021

General

Advert: Admission to PhD in Public Health Programme 2024/2025

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The Academic Registrar, Makerere University invites applications from suitable candidates for admission to a Three Year Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health (By Coursework & Dissertation) with the following Tracks for the 2024/2025 Academic Year tenable in the College of Health Sciences:

  • Health Systems,
  • Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
  • Community Health and Behavioural Sciences,
  • Disease Control and
  • Environmental Health

In addition to the general admission requirements of Makerere University, Applicants should possess the following qualifications:

A master’s degree from a recognized and chartered university in health sciences e.g. Medicine (Human and Veterinary), Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Public Health, etc;

OR

A masters’ degree in Biological Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Laboratory Sciences;

OR

A masters’ degree in Social Sciences i.e. Social Work, Sociology, Economics, Statistics, Demography, Monitoring and Evaluation with at least three consecutive years’ working experience in a health related program.

Candidates whose first language is not English or did not go through an education system with

English as the medium of instruction will be required to prove that they have sufficient command of the English language to cope with post-graduate studies at Makerere University.

Candidates for the Epidemiology and Biostatistics track should have undertaken both MPH 7103 Applied Biostatistics I and MPH 7203 Applied Biostatistics II, and any other course in statisticswith equivalent content, with a pass grade point of at least 3.0.

Candidates for the Health Systems track should have had at least three consecutive years work in a health related program except holders of master’s in health sciences.

Strictly observe the closing date of 31st May, 2024

Contact the offices of the Dean, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences for any further information regarding the programme.

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Research

11 CARTA Fellows Triumph with Postdoctoral Awards

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Dr. Henry Zakumumpa, Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH). Photo: YouTube/Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC). Kampala Uganda, East Africa.

We celebrate our 11 outstanding fellows for receiving postdoctoral awards from CARTA after a competitive selection process. Among them are four recipients of fellowship grants: Nanfizat Abiket Alamukii, Adeyinka Olufolake Adefolarin, and Blessings Nyasilia Kaunda-Khangamwa. Additionally, seven fellows have received re-entry grants: Skye Nandi Adams, Christine Minoo Mbindyo, Priscille Musabirema, Oyeyemi Olajumoke Oyelade, Eniola Olubukola Cadmus, and Alex John Ntamatungiro. Join us on a journey to explore the topics, significance, and uniqueness of each fellow’s research, deserving of this prestigious recognition.

Fellowship Grants

Henry Zakumumpa

Affiliation: Makerere University, School of Public Health

Host institution: Moi University, College of Health Sciences

What is your research topic?

Leveraging differentiated service delivery models in Uganda to address the syndemics of HIV, hypertension, and diabetes

Why is your research important?

In Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), we’re confronting a health crisis with rising non-communicable diseases (NCDs) like hypertension and diabetes, alongside ongoing challenges in HIV treatment. While diseases like HIV and malaria receive global support, NCDs like diabetes and hypertension often get overlooked. It’s frustrating, but we must bridge this gap to ensure care reaches those in need.

What is unique about your research?

Since 2004, Uganda’s received $5B+ in donor aid for HIV, driving innovations in care and treatment access. Building on this success, my study leverages HIV care platforms to combat hypertension and diabetes epidemics. Exploring community-based drug distribution, I aim to extend medication access for HIV and NCDs in Uganda and beyond.

What can you tell CARTA and your affiliation?

Thanks to CARTA and Makerere University, I can conduct crucial research on rising non-communicable diseases in Africa, contributing to vital solutions. Their commitment to empowering African-led research is pivotal in advancing agendas continent-wide. Grateful for this opportunity!

Source: CARTA

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Business & Management

Study Reveals Taxation Issues in Uganda’s Informal Economy

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Lack of a structured taxation framework for informal businesses - a significant cause of tax non-compliance among traders in Uganda. Underlying factors contributing to the shadow economy and its implications for the national tax system, a collaborative research project involving eight university scholars. Dissemination workshop by Principal Investigator Dr. Ismail Kintu and others, 25th April 2024, Nansana Municipality Council, Wakiso District, Uganda. East Africa. Group photo of the workshop participants.

A recent study by researchers at Makerere University’s College of Business and Management Sciences has identified the lack of a structured taxation framework for informal businesses as a significant cause of tax non-compliance among traders in Uganda. This revelation came from a collaborative research project involving eight university scholars, who examined the underlying factors contributing to the shadow economy and its implications for the national tax system.

The findings were presented by Dr. Ismail Kintu, the study’s Principal Investigator, at a dissemination workshop held in Nansana Municipality Council, Wakiso District, on Thursday. The research, initiated in 2022, aimed to assess traders’ perceptions of fairness within the taxation system and how this relates to voluntary tax compliance.

“Traders said the system is unfair to them,” Dr. Kintu explained during the workshop. “Our research aimed to understand what fairness means in Uganda’s context.” According to the study, fairness in the tax system is crucial for voluntary compliance, suggesting that taxes should be aligned with one’s revenue, and penalties should be applied equitably.

Dr. Kintu the PI of the research project. Lack of a structured taxation framework for informal businesses - a significant cause of tax non-compliance among traders in Uganda. Underlying factors contributing to the shadow economy and its implications for the national tax system, a collaborative research project involving eight university scholars. Dissemination workshop by Principal Investigator Dr. Ismail Kintu and others, 25th April 2024, Nansana Municipality Council, Wakiso District, Uganda. East Africa.
Dr. Kintu the PI of the research project.

The researchers developed a proposed framework for taxing the informal economy, emphasizing the importance of consulting key stakeholders, such as district commercial officers, tax consultants, and leaders from traders’ associations, before implementing tax policies. The framework recommends engaging these stakeholders in meetings with the Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) and the Ministry of Finance to ensure that new tax policies are inclusive and fair.

The study also suggests the need for flexibility in tax collection, advocating for payment in installments and prior notification to traders before collecting taxes. This approach, the researchers argue, would help build trust and encourage compliance among informal traders.

The researchers’ proposed framework includes annual mapping of policy gaps in the informal economy and developing solutions to address them. This process would involve regular consultations with stakeholders to refine the tax system and maintain fairness.

Mr Festo Tandeka, the Town Clerk of Nansana Municipality. Lack of a structured taxation framework for informal businesses - a significant cause of tax non-compliance among traders in Uganda. Underlying factors contributing to the shadow economy and its implications for the national tax system, a collaborative research project involving eight university scholars. Dissemination workshop by Principal Investigator Dr. Ismail Kintu and others, 25th April 2024, Nansana Municipality Council, Wakiso District, Uganda. East Africa.
Mr Festo Tandeka, the Town Clerk of Nansana Municipality.

Local officials who attended the workshop expressed support for the research findings. Mr. Festo Tandeka, Nansana Municipality town clerk, encouraged traders to cultivate a culture of paying taxes but cautioned against excessive taxation. He recommended allowing tax payments in installments to avoid overburdening traders.

Similarly, Mr. Shaffic Ali Nsubuga, Nansana Municipality Deputy Resident District Commissioner, urged tax officers to approach tax collection with compassion, suggesting that prior notices be given to traders before taxes are collected.

The findings of the Makerere University study arrive at a critical time, as Ugandan traders have recently protested against increasing taxes. Mr. Joshua Mawerere, a youth representative from the Kampala City Traders Association, welcomed the study, noting that it brings clarity to issues surrounding tax policies. He urged the government to raise awareness about new tax systems, like the Electronic Fiscal Receipting and Invoicing Solution (EFRIS), which some traders mistakenly perceive as additional taxes.

The study’s comprehensive approach to understanding the informal economy’s taxation challenges may pave the way for a more inclusive and equitable tax system in Uganda, fostering greater compliance and reducing the size of the shadow economy.

The research was funded by the government of Uganda through the Makerere University Research and Innovations Fund (Mak-RIF). Speaking at the stakeholders’ engagement on April 25th, Ms Evelyn Nyacho who represented the chair of the grants committee, congratulated Dr. Kintu and team upon the timely research finding. She said the findings would help URA and the traders coming after a traders’ strike over taxation. She said Mak-RIF was happy to sponsor research that is aimed at solving society issues like taxation. “I was happy to learn that taxes can be pay in installments. I hope traders can embrace this flexibility in paying taxes,” she said. She appreciated government for the research funding to the university. The government commits Shs30 billion annually to research at Makerere University in an effort to spur development of the country.

The research team

Dr Kintu (PI), Prof Eria Hisali (Co. PI), Dr Fred Bateganya, Dr Willy Kagarura, Mr Patrick Lumala, Mr Nicholas Musoke, Ms Marion Atukunda, and Ms Winfred Nalwoga.

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