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CAES staff sensitization on the Grants Administration & Management Support Unit (GAMSU)

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The Grants Administration and Management Support Unit (GAMSU) was established by Makerere University Council through the Makerere University Grants Administration and Management Policy on 17th December 2020. GAMSU is governed by a Steering Committee of 9 members, chaired by the Deputy Vice Chancellor in charge of Finance and Administration. The Steering Committee is supported by the Secretariat which is led by the Head, GAMSU, currently Prof. Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo.

Prof. Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo briefing CAES staff on the purpose of the Grants Administration and Management Support Unit (GAMSU).
Prof. Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo briefing CAES staff on the purpose of the Grants Administration and Management Support Unit (GAMSU).

The main purpose of GAMSU is to streamline the administration and management of grants and contracts within the various units of the University as well as provide a supportive eco-system for grants mobilization and management. Specific objectives include; establishing a framework for grants mobilization and management within the University; creating a platform to track and monitor grants within the University; establishing strategic global partnerships with other institutions with the intent to solicit funds for scholarships, research and infrastructure development; providing guidelines through which projects funded by grants link to existing laws, policies and regulations governing Makerere as a public University; and defining the roles of different University Officials in the mobilization, management, and administration of grants at the University.

Prof. John Tabuti sharing views on grants administration.
Prof. John Tabuti sharing views on grants administration.

Functions of GAMSU

  1. Ensuring that Makerere University is registered with various funding agencies where necessary;
  2. Supporting Faculty and other staff of the University in the preparation of grants applications including;eligibility checks for grant opportunities, proofing adherence to applications;
  3. Support award winners in the grant negotiations and coordinate with relevant University authorities for project account set up wherever necessary;
  4. Following up with Principal Investigators to ensure timely compliance with grant contract conditions and University Policies;
  5. Maintaining a database of all grants in the University;
  6. Ensuring that all projects comply with the laws and policies of the university;
  7. Undertake monitoring, evaluation and quality assurance in the execution of grants at the University;
  8. Follow-up with Principal Investigators to ensure timely compliance with grant contract conditions and University policies;
  9. Ensuring that concluded projects are appropriately closed out in accordance with University policies and guidelines;
  10. Maintaining a database of all grants in the university;
CAES staff at the GAMSU senstization meeting.
CAES staff at the GAMSU senstization meeting.

Sensitization meeting at CAES

On 28th April 2022, GAMSU Administrators held a meeting to sensitize CAES staff on the general roles of the Unit and grants financial management. During the meeting held at the School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-Engineering Conference Hall, the Head of GAMSU, Prof. Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo briefed staff on policy, functions, levels of GAMSU grants support, common grant submission platforms, capacity building for staff and expectations from Colleges. Mr George Mugabi Turyamureeba, Head Finance at GAMSU/Mak-RIF sensitized staff on grants financial management, specifically focusing on financial planning, financial control, administration and records management, as well as reporting and auditing. Mr. Yunusu Musisi, End User Support Administrator briefed staff on the GAMSU Database Management System, benefits of the system and some of its features.

Mr. George Mugabi Turyamureeba briefed staff on grants financial management.
Mr. George Mugabi Turyamureeba briefed staff on grants financial management.

Issues arising from the Meeting

  1. It is important to monitor progress and write close out reports at the end of every project
  2. Monitoring and evaluation of project expenditure is vital for proper financial management – minimizes gaps in project implementation
  3. There is need to rethink the amount and management of institutional overheads
  4. There is need for regular guidance and sensitization on grant management
  5. Staff need guidance on the management of grant funds – (how to deal with foreign currency fluctuations)
  6. There is need to assist all staff get access to grants
  7. There is also need to harmonize reporting formats
Mr. Yunusu Musisi briefed staff on the GAMSU Website and Database Management System.
Mr. Yunusu Musisi briefed staff on the GAMSU Website and Database Management System.

Expectations from Colleges and staff

  • Submission up to date Information on grants and donations, new, existing and those that are closing out
  • Submission of quarterly grants reports
  • Presentation of staff needs to GAMSU for support and capacity building
  • Sharing challenges experienced in relation grants administration with GAMSU
  • Sharing best practices for the good of researcher with GAMSU
The Head, Department of Agricultural Production at CAES, Dr. Mildred Ochwo Semakula at the GAMSU sensitization meeting.
The Head, Department of Agricultural Production at CAES, Dr. Mildred Ochwo Semakula at the GAMSU sensitization meeting.

Capacity Needs Assessment

In a bid to manage the process better, GAMSU has organized a Survey to establish the Capacity Needs of faculty and other staff in the respective colleges, schools, departments and Units within the University to inform and guide the grants administration and management support activities.

Prof. Yusuf Baruhanga at the sensitization meeting.
Prof. Yusuf Baruhanga at the sensitization meeting.

Please follow the link below to fill the needs assessment form.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScS-EdUg3_sTJ_A9jXfhozXwB26G97wzmAH8Ij_7X3ltD0EXQ/viewform?usp=pp_url

Mr. Laban Lwasa from GAMSU addressing staff on the Needs Assement tool during the meeting.
Mr. Laban Lwasa from GAMSU addressing staff on the Needs Assement tool during the meeting.

Presentations on the roles of GAMSU, grants financial Management, and the GAMSU Website and Database Management System may be accessed below.

Agriculture & Environment

Mak Trains Animal Health Practitioners in Pig Artificial Insemination

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The Coordinator of the programme, Dr Donald Kugonza (seated right) together with the guests and trainees at the Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAEC), MUARIK where the training was conducted. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.

Piggery farming in Uganda is on the rise more especially due to the ready market both within and outside the country. Just like any other business, farmers require a lot of input if they are to reap big from the business. Reproductive assistance techniques, such as Artificial Insemination (AI), have proved to be very effective in enhancing the quality of breeds leading to improved production and productivity. Implementing AI reproductive techniques allows optimizing production conditions, reducing their costs, and increasing their efficiency. With support from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Makerere University in collaboration with a number of partners, including district veterinary officers has conducted countrywide trainings in AI in a bid to increase the pool of pig artificial insemination service practitioners.

The Coordinator of the training programme, Dr Donald Kugonza, Associate Professor at CAES, Makerere University. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
The Coordinator of the training programme, Dr Donald Kugonza, Associate Professor at CAES, Makerere University.

From 28th February-3rd March 2024, Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) conducted a training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda. The training held at Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK) was organized by Dr Donald Kugonza, an Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural Production, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, also coordinator of ILRI’s More Pork projects in Uganda.

The Representative of ILRI Country Director, Mr. Ronnie Ahumuza (standing) enlightened the trainees on the pig value chain in Uganda. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
The Representative of ILRI Country Director, Mr. Ronnie Ahumuza (standing) enlightened the trainees on the pig value chain in Uganda.

During the five days of the training, the farmers were exposed to knowledge on a number of aspects including; i) the merits and demerits of pig artificial insemination; ii) the Uganda pig value chain- key actors, opportunities, challenges; iii) pig breeds and their characteristics- farmers preferences, straight breeding and terminal crossing, selection and culling;  iv) hormonal regulation of female heat cycle, signs of heat and methods for heat detection; v) boar spray/smell, pregnancy diagnosis methods, gestation and weaning, growth and selection; vi) records management; vii) the role of NAGRC in pig breeding – Animal Breeding Act and breeds available at NAGRC stations; as well as viii) Animal Breeding Regulations. The farmers also acquired skills on semen collection, evaluation, extension, packaging, labeling and storage; reproductive diseases and management; animal hygiene; catheterization on tracts and live sows, sow stimulation, semen deposition; and biosecurity protocols. The farmers were also trained on care and maintenance of AI equipment.

Some of the animal health practitioners who participated in the training. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
Some of the animal health practitioners who participated in the training.

Facilitators included; Dr Donald Kugonza from CAES, Makerere University (handled genetics and breeding); Dr Gerald Kirembe from AFIRD (animal health); Dr Gerald Nizeyimana from the College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University (animal health); Dr Godfrey Bamundaga Kyobe, Wakiso District Veterinary Officer (artificial insemination in pigs); Dr. Leonard Kawuule from Vetline Services (pig technologies); Ms. Esther Nakajubi from NAGRC&DB (animal production);  Mr. Robert Natumanya from the CAES, Makerere University (animal production); Mr. Eric Semwezi, private AI practitioner; Dr. Alex Mukasa from MAAIF (animal production); and Mr. Isaac Kasoro from Makerere University (pig technologies).

Dr Helen Nakimbugwe, Technical Manager, Breeding at NAGRC appreciated the organizers for involving more women in the programme. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Helen Nakimbugwe, Technical Manager, Breeding at NAGRC appreciated the organizers for involving more women in the programme.

The training was supported through the One CGIAR initiative for Sustainable Animal Productivity for Livelihoods, Nutrition and Gender Inclusion (SAPLING), that aims to transform livestock sectors in seven countries including Uganda, through a pipeline of existing and new innovations. SAPLING is being implemented by the ILRI, International Centre for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) and the Alliance of Bioversity International and International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (ABC). SAPLING Uganda is geared towards improving the livelihoods of livestock producers and other actors in the pig, dairy and beef value chains. Uganda is one of focus countries for this initiative given the importance of livestock in the livelihoods of its people and the commitment of public and private actors to transform food systems through sustainable livestock development. 

Dr Helen Nakimbugwe addressing the trainees. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Helen Nakimbugwe addressing the trainees.

On behalf of the Country Director, ILRI, Mr. Ronnie Ahumuza appreciated the partners including MAAIF, NAGRC, Makerere University and district local governments for supporting the programme. Delivering a presentation on the pig value chain in Uganda, Mr. Ahumuza noted that the sector was highly neglected yet the demand for pork was on the rise. He informed participants that ILRI had piloted a number of innovations to improve the sector including interventions under the MorePork 1 and MorePork II projects that targeted diagnostic studies to identify constraints and opportunities in the pork value chains, testing of interventions to address the identified constraints, market systems development, and introduction of PigSmart Innovations (gross margin calculator, digital extension, feed calculator). The organization is currently implementing a project on Sustainable Animal Productivity for Livelihoods, Nutrition and Gender Inclusion (SAPLING) geared towards improving the livelihoods of livestock producers and other actors in the pig, dairy and beef value chains.

The Commissioner, Animal Production at MAAIF, Dr Theophilus Mwesige addressing the trainees. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
The Commissioner, Animal Production at MAAIF, Dr Theophilus Mwesige addressing the trainees.

Explaining the mandate of his sector that mainly focuses on improving production and productivity of livestock, the Commissioner, Animal Production at MAAIF, Dr Theophilus Mwesige said piggery production was still low in country, proposing a number of interventions to boost the sector.

Wakiso District Veterinary Officer, Dr Godfrey Bamundaga Kyobe (standing) addressing the trainees at the opening ceremony. Makerere University in collaboration with ILRI, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF) and the National Animal Genetic Resources Centre and Data Bank (NAGRC & DB) Training of over 20 animal health practitioners from Central Uganda pig artificial insemination training, 28th February-3rd March 2024, Continuing Agricultural Education Centre (CAES), Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute Kabanyolo (MUARIK), Wakiso, Uganda, East Africa.
Wakiso District Veterinary Officer, Dr Godfrey Bamundaga Kyobe (standing) addressing the trainees at the opening ceremony.

The meeting was graced by the Technical Manager, Breeding at NAGRC, Dr Helen Nakimbugwe and Wakiso District Veterinary Officer Dr Bamundaga Kyobe Godfrey who shared experiences on AI in livestock.

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Agriculture & Environment

FAO Trains CAES Faculty on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN)

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The Head, Department of Food Technology and Nutrition at CAES, Dr Ivan Mukisa Muzira and Dr Hedwig Acham briefing participants about the training programme. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.

The primary objective of this training initiative is to promote knowledge exchange and learning about innovative systems, methods, tools, and best practices in nutrition surveillance.

The training

The School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University has held a four-day training for its staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN). The training held from 26th-29th February 2024 has been conducted at the School premises at the University.

The Dean SFTNB, Dr Julia Kigozi delivering her remarks on the training programme. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
The Dean SFTNB, Dr Julia Kigozi delivering her remarks on the training programme.

The training initiative emerged from the collaborative efforts of the “Learning Network on Nutrition Surveillance.” The implementation of this initiative is led by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD). This network, fostering connections between policymakers, research institutions, and universities, spans across the countries of Djibouti, Malawi, Zambia, Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda.

The primary objective of this initiative is to promote knowledge exchange and learning about innovative systems, methods, tools, and best practices in nutrition surveillance. The initiative fosters knowledge exchange on innovative systems, methods, tools, and practices in nutrition surveillance, with a special emphasis on the East, Central, and Southern Africa region, and the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) for Food Security and Nutrition stands as a crucial element within this network.

Dr Julia Kigozi addressing participants on the importance of the programme. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Julia Kigozi addressing participants on the importance of the programme.

FAO’s contribution

One of the key contributors to this training initiative is the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), leveraging its two decades of experience. FAO has meticulously designed face-to-face training sessions for professionals in food security and nutrition. Furthermore, they have developed a comprehensive curriculum for graduate and post-graduate students focusing on the IPC for Acute Malnutrition scale (AMN).

This AMN course is crafted to equip graduates with the essential skills for IPC, but also serve as a pathway for IPC certification, enhancing their professional credentials as they embark on their careers. Notably, a similar curriculum addressing acute food insecurity has been successfully implemented at the University of Pretoria, and has worked successfully.

Dr Jannie Armstrong, Integrated Phase Classification's Learning and Research Coordinator during the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Jannie Armstrong, Integrated Phase Classification’s Learning and Research Coordinator during the training.

As a significant stride towards expanding the reach of this valuable curriculum, FAO has played a pivotal role in training the academic staff at Makerere University (Department of Food Technology and Nutrition) on both the structure and content of the AMN course curriculum. This strategic partnership aims to facilitate the eventual incorporation of this curriculum into the institution’s offerings.

Facilitating this training was Dr Jannie Armstrong, Integrated Phase Classification’s Learning and Research Coordinator. Dr Armstrong brings a wealth of experience to the table, overseeing the academic liaison portfolio and ensuring that IPC remains informed of developments in food security and nutrition research globally. His commitment is evident through co-developing IPC training materials and contributing as a member of the Technical Development Team.

Some of the staff and students that participated in the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Some of the staff and students that participated in the training.

Over the past 25 years, Dr Armstrong has contributed significantly to food security policy across Asia, Africa, and Europe, working with esteemed organizations such as FAO, WFP, and others. His enduring research interest in food security policy in the Global South reflects his dedication to making a positive impact in this field.

Appreciation

“As educators, we recognize the paramount importance of preparing our students for the evolving workforce, and FAO’s initiative is a testament of our commitment to continuous improvement in teaching and learning, aligning perfectly with our objectives. We express our sincere appreciation for this collaborative effort and are confident that together, we shall rise to meet the evolving needs of our stakeholders both within and outside Uganda,” remarked Dr Hedwig Acham, Senior Lecturer, Department of Food Technology & Nutrition, Makerere University.

More photos from the event.

Dr Jannie Armstrong training participants on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN). Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Jannie Armstrong training participants on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN).
Dr Ivan Mukisa Muzira and another member of staff at the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Ivan Mukisa Muzira and another member of staff at the training.
Dr Hedwig Acham (Front L), Dr Robert Fungo (at the back) and another member of staff at the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Hedwig Acham (Front L), Dr Robert Fungo (at the back) and another member of staff at the training.
Dr Agnes Nabubuya, a Lecturer in the Department of Food Technology and Nutrition during the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Agnes Nabubuya, a Lecturer in the Department of Food Technology and Nutrition during the training.
Dr Jannie Armstrong, Integrated Phase Classification's Learning and Research Coordinator conducted the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Jannie Armstrong, Integrated Phase Classification’s Learning and Research Coordinator conducted the training.
Dr Hedwig Acham and Dr Robert Fungo at the training. Training by FAO of staff and students on Integrated Food Security Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC-AMN), School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-systems Engineering (SFTNB), College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr Hedwig Acham and Dr Robert Fungo at the training.

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Agriculture & Environment

Ground-breaking Partnership Yields Successful Oilseed Processing Course in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Participants from partner institutions on the final day of the training at the School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-engineering, Makerere University. CAES, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.

Sub-Saharan Africa, February 29, 2024 – A landmark collaboration between the American Oil Chemist’s Society (AOCS), Cultivating New Frontiers in Agriculture (CNFA), the Soybean Innovation Lab (SIL), Makerere University (School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bioengineering (SFTNB), and the National Agriculture Research Laboratory (NARL) of Uganda has culminated in a transformative oilseed processing course, enriching regional expertise and capabilities. Designed to elevate Sub-Saharan Africa’s oilseed processing industry, the course leveraged AOCS content from industry and academic members, delivering world-class expertise to a cadre of regional processors. Held over 2.5 intensive days at the NARL and Makerere University SFTNB – Food Technology and Business Incubation Center, the course welcomed a capacity-filled cohort comprising participants from Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, and the host country, Uganda.

One of the facilitators with participants in session. School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bioengineering, CAES, Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
One of the facilitators with participants in session.

Supported by the Processor-to-Processor (P2P) program, AOCS volunteers Grant Mitchell, P.E., Bruce Patsey led the facilitator team together with Dr. Robert Mugabi (Makerere University) and Dr. David Bamwirire (NARL).  P2P is an initiative with AOCS, CNFA, and SIL that brings one-on-one technical expertise to SSA processors under the umbrella of USAID’s Farmer-to-Farmer (F2F) program, implemented by CNFA in Southern Africa. The course’s impact was amplified by a preceding Training of Trainers (TOT) session, where AOCS and Ugandan facilitating teams collaborated to sustainably disseminate the latest industry technical expertise while addressing the unique challenges encountered by many Sub-Saharan African processors.

Participants view processing equipment. School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bioengineering, CAES, Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Participants view processing equipment.

The success of the course stands as a testament to the transformative potential of collaborative initiatives in addressing critical industry challenges and driving meaningful progress across Sub-Saharan Africa.

Participants view processing equipment. School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bioengineering, CAES, Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Participants view processing equipment.

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