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Makerere & Johns Hopkins Universities Release Report on Speed and Helmet Use in Kampala

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Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) and the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) have launched the status summary report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, in partnership with Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) and Vital Strategies.

The report was launched at Hotel Africana in Kampala on January 16, 2024. It delineates key findings, including the average speed of speeding vehicles at a high average of 57km/hr, higher speeds on roads partially accessible to pedestrians compared to roads freely accessible to pedestrians.  Also, helmet usage remains low among motorcyclists and is almost non-existent among passengers, contributing to a rise in accidents and fatalities since 2020.

There has been a variable trend in the reported numbers of deaths and serious injuries since 2018. Specifically, in 2022, there was a 1% increase in reported deaths compared to 2021, while serious injuries witnessed a 4% decrease during the same period.

In 2018, a total of 294 death were recorded, 315 recorded in 2019 while 236 were recorded in 2020. In 2021, there were 419 road traffic death and 425 recorded in 2022. Motorcyclists accounted for nearly half (49%) of the reported deaths followed by pedestrians made up 44% of deaths. In a bid to improve road safety by providing quality data, the research the Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety (BIGRS) made roadside observations on speed and helmet use in Kampala City.

The researchers made six observation rounds citing 500,000 for speed and 600,000 cyclists to determine helmet use. The results, based on data collected between February 2021 and October 2023 indicate that the mean speed among speeding vehicles was high mostly among sport utility vehicles (SUVs) at 10%, sedans/saloons at 9%, minibuses/minivans at 8), and pickup/light trucks at 7%. Five percent of the observed vehicles were exceeding the posted speed limit.

A cyclist lying on the ground following an accident in Kampala. Photo by Katumba Badru Sultan
A cyclist lying on the ground following an accident in Kampala. Photo by Katumba Badru Sultan

Speeding in Kampala

Presenting findings, Mr. Bonny Balugaba, a Researcher based at the Trauma, Injuries and Trauma Unit of MakSPH noted that the international best practices for speed management recommend a safe speed of 30 km/h on roads where conflicts between cars and unprotected users are possible. Also, 50 km/h speed is recommended at intersections where side-on conflicts between cars may occur. This is particularly applicable in urban areas.

Mr. Bonny Balugaba, a Researcher based at the Trauma, Injuries and Trauma Unit of MakSPH speaks to the media shortly after the dissemination of the report at Hotel African, Kampala. Photo by Davidson Ndyabahika. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Mr. Bonny Balugaba, a Researcher based at the Trauma, Injuries and Trauma Unit of MakSPH speaks to the media shortly after the dissemination of the report at Hotel African, Kampala. Photo by Davidson Ndyabahika

“If in Kampala we are seeing 57km/h speed, it means that we are way above the recommended speed limits and we know that beyond 40km/h, the chances of survival of someone that has been knocked are very minimal,” says Balugaba.

The researchers recommend enforcing a 50 km/h speed limit in metropolitan areas and a 30 km/h limit in places where motorized traffic interacts with bikes and pedestrians. In order to safeguard vulnerable road users, particularly the Ministry of Works and Transport and the Kampala Capital City Authority, it suggests implementing speed-calming techniques including bumps and signage as well as designating low-speed areas.

Investigators further advise the Kampala Metropolitan Traffic Police to increase enforcement, especially on local roads and on vehicles such as SUVs, sedans, pickup trucks, minibuses on routes with limited pedestrian access. It is recommended that public awareness campaigns and enforcement measures regarding the dangers of speeding be regularly monitored and evaluated to ensure continued efficacy.

Balugaba noted; “Mass media is good but if you are telling me the dangers of speed but am not apprehended on speed then it tends to entertainment. You come, entertain me with your campaign and adverts and go away but you are not enforcing.”

Some of the participants follow proceedings during the launch. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Some of the participants follow proceedings during the launch.

Helmet Use in Kampala

Helmet use compliance among motorcyclists was notably low at 39%, and even lower for passengers at 2%. This trend persisted on both local and collector roads (39%) and arterial roads (40%). During weekends, helmet use dropped by 20%. Ride-share motorcycle drivers, particularly Safe Boda, exhibited the highest compliance at 84%, surpassing commercial motorcycle drivers (50%), taxi drivers (55%), and private/government motorcycle users (55%).

From 2020 to 2022, 210 motorcycle occupants and 185 pedestrians lost their lives. Notably, 40% of pedestrian fatalities resulted from collisions with cars, SUVs, or pickups, whereas 36% of motorcycle deaths were attributed to accidents involving other motorcycles.

“We saw that only 2% of the motorcycles are using helmets. This really means that the situation is still bad. We need to put in place measures knowing that helmets save those that are wearing them,” says Balugaba.

Mr. Bonny Balugaba, a Researcher based at the Trauma, Injuries and Trauma Unit of MakSPH speaks to the media shortly after the dissemination of the report at Hotel African, Kampala. Photo by Davidson Ndyabahika. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Mr. Bonny Balugaba, a Researcher based at the Trauma, Injuries and Trauma Unit of MakSPH speaks to the media shortly after the dissemination of the report at Hotel African, Kampala. Photo by Davidson Ndyabahika

Adding that while four of every 10 riders are wearing a helmet but less than one in every 10 passengers has a helmet. “is it that passengers have harder heads than riders? That in case they are involved in a crash, they don’t get affected? These are issues we need to work on.”

While sharing the data outcomes, Dr Raphael Awuah, the African Regional Advisor on Data and Surveillance for Vital Strategies notes that while many of the cities in Africa, pedestrians constitute the majority fatalities, this is different for Kampala. “For most parts of Africa, we see that pedestrians account for most fatalities. However, in Kampala, this is not the case. We see that majority of the deaths are among the motorcyclists and this trend has been observed since 2018. So clearly this emphasizes the need to prioritize the vulnerable road users in Kampala particularly motorcyclists and pedestrians.”

Dr. Raphael Awuah, the African Regional Advisor on Data and Surveillance for Vital Strategies speaking at the dissemination. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr. Raphael Awuah, the African Regional Advisor on Data and Surveillance for Vital Strategies speaking at the dissemination.

The top five locations for pedestrian fatalities and serious injuries from 2019 to 2022 are high-capacity roads: Kampala Road, Jinja Road, Bombo Road, Entebbe Road, and Masaka Road.

The distribution of motorcycle fatal crash locations does not exhibit any clear pattern, but there is a noticeable concentration on high-capacity highways. Kampala Road, Masaka Road, Bombo Road, Kisaasi Road, and the Northern Bypass are the top five places.

“While it is true that these are high capacity roads, speeding is probably one of the causes of fatalities. I hope we will use this data to inform the discussions, actions, plans, strategies to reduce the outcomes that I have just shared,” observed Dr Raphael Awuah. 

The Kampala Metropolitan Traffic Police has been urged to increase the enforcement of proper helmet use, with a focus on passengers, taxis, and commercial motorbikes on arterial, local, and collector roads all week round. Also, KCCA and the Ministry of Works and Transport may want to start public awareness programs promoting the appropriate use of helmets and advocate for sanctions and fines for improper helmet wear in conjunction with coordinated increased enforcement.

Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies hands a copy of the Kampala Summary Status Report on Road Safety Risk Factors to CSO representatives. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies hands a copy of the Kampala Summary Status Report on Road Safety Risk Factors to CSO representatives.

“This is about behavioral change. It is extremely difficult. We are all humans. All of us know that speeding is bad for us but when we get behind the wheel, we will still try to speed. All of us know that wearing a helmet will protect our heads, but only 2% of us wear helmets when we are riding on a motorcycle. So what else is needed? Yes, knowledge is important, it is important to tell people why they should be putting on these helmets and the consequences they will face if they don’t wear them but it is also important to have reinforcing mechanism. Yes, mass media campaigns are important but equally important is visible and widespread enforcement,” explained Dr. Abdulgafoor Bachani, Director of JH-IIRU.

Dr. Abdulgafoor Bachani, Director of JH-IIRU hands over the Kampala Summary Status Report to SP. Michael Kananura, spokesperson, Traffic and Road Safety Directorate, Uganda Police Force during the launch at Hotel Africana on Tuesday, January 16, 2024. Photo by Davidson Ndyabahika. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Dr. Abdulgafoor Bachani, Director of JH-IIRU hands over the Kampala Summary Status Report to SP. Michael Kananura, spokesperson, Traffic and Road Safety Directorate, Uganda Police Force during the launch at Hotel Africana on Tuesday, January 16, 2024. Photo by Davidson Ndyabahika

On his part, Dr. Fredrick Oporia said “Road safety is an issue of concern to everyone. To improve this safety, we must have high-quality data on the risk factors and share it with our stakeholders. Most importantly, we need local stakeholders who are charged with making laws and policies for the country because this is a systems issue that calls for systems thinking. We must involve the local to get the attention of the international.”

SP. Michael Kananura, spokesperson, Traffic and Road Safety Directorate, Uganda Police Force says there is a regulation on helmet use targeting not only riders but also passengers, although he acknowledges challenges with enforcement. He calls on the public support these public health and road safety measures.  

SP. Michael Kananura, spokesperson, Traffic and Road Safety Directorate, Uganda Police Force speaks to journalists at the launch of the status report. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
SP. Michael Kananura, spokesperson, Traffic and Road Safety Directorate, Uganda Police Force speaks to journalists at the launch of the status report.

“We really appreciate our colleagues from MakSPH and the rest for this work and the academia generally for the work you are doing in as far as research is concerned and also being able to share with us this data. We also use this data to improve in our enforcements. It guides us on areas of improvement and prioritization. The data really is so helpful to us and we also continue to work to see how we can improve in that area. We have a unit in traffic directorate that is for enforcement basically,” SP Kananura.  

Comments from KCCA leadership

Hon. Kizza Hakim Sawula, the lord councilor from Lubaga and Executive Secretary and a Minister for Works and Physical Planning –KCCA noted that one of the causes of this these accidents in the capital city is the poor-quality roads that wear out easily with numerous potholes and the meagre maintenance budget appropriated by parliament to the city authority.

Hon. Kizza Hakim Sawula, the lord councilor from Lubaga and a Minister for Works and Physical Planning -KCCA speaking at the launch. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Hon. Kizza Hakim Sawula, the lord councilor from Lubaga and a Minister for Works and Physical Planning -KCCA speaking at the launch.

“Can you imagine that each kilometer of the road within Kampala is constructed at an average cost of 14 billion shillings. For the last three budgets, we were getting 78bn but but in the current budget, we received only 43 billion shillings for the entire capital, for the entire financial year for roads, drainages and traffic lights. How many kilometers are we looking at? 3 kilometers for a financial year, 43 billion shillings?

We used to get Shs26 billion from the national road fund, for road maintenance every financial year. You can confirm from the mayors and load counselors here. This time around, we received only 11 billion for all the maintenance. Now, what do we expect out of that money? So, the task is upon the members of the Parliament to improve on the budget. We have 2,110 kilometers of roads within Kampala. Only 654 kilometers are paved, when shall we complete the entire balance? So, we need a budget, enough budget from the members of parliament. When we talk to MPs they only talk about loans we get from development partners which is usually for new roads,” explained Hon. Sawula.

Concerned, Nakawa Division Mayor, Paul Mugambe said it was disheartening that many people continue to lose their lives prematurely. He cited that not every death is predetermined by the Lord. “Driving at excessively high speeds, and resulting in a crash is not the Lord’s decision. Many individuals lose their lives prematurely due to reckless behavior, and it’s truly regrettable.”

Nakawa Division Mayor, Paul Mugambe speaks to the media at the launch. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Nakawa Division Mayor, Paul Mugambe speaks to the media at the launch.

Mr. Mugambe urged Police to use the evidence provided to improve on the enforcement of road traffic laws and regulations.

Prof. Elizeus Rutebemberwa, the Deputy Dean, MakSPH thanked the Bloomberg Philanthilopies “for supporting us to help ourselves” and the JH-IIRU for the technical support to the TRIAD unit, the university and many partners. He also noted that the urban population in Uganda is steadily increasing and called for proactive and inclusive urban planning.

Prof. Elizeus Rutebemberwa, the Deputy Dean, MakSPH speaks at the launch. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Prof. Elizeus Rutebemberwa, the Deputy Dean, MakSPH speaks at the launch.

“From 2012, the urban population was 20%. In 2022, which is one year and a half ago, it was 26%. So, one in four people in Uganda were in urban areas. Now in 2040 it is estimated that 33 million would be living in urban areas and that would be 46%. So, it’s not getting better, it’s getting worse. So, we need to manage our urban areas so that people don’t shift from the rural areas to come to die in urban areas,” said Prof. Rutebemberwa.

He called on government and the city authority to fast-track mass transport systems to reduce congestion on the roads. “Look at the traffic that come to Kampala. They are in private cars and each one is carrying one person. In very few cases, two people. Now, if you have all those cars for one kilometre stretch, you could actually park all those people in one bus. And you have all space and you reduce the pollution, why should this be difficult for people to know that. For you to have an organized urban area, you need mass transport. You don’t need to research to know that. So why don’t we have them? Some of these things, some of them we talked about in the national drive, dedicated walk lanes.

According to Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies, road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death for people aged 5 to 29. She mentioned that the fatalities from road traffic are at a crisis level in Uganda.

Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies urged stakeholders to utilise the data for proper decision making. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies urged stakeholders to utilise the data for proper decision making. 

“I want to say this again. This is the leading cause of death. It’s not HIV. It’s not tuberculosis. It’s real traffic injuries for people aged 5 to 29. Those are the young people. We had the mayor talking about the economic impact as well. These are young people going to school, getting trained, coming back into your workforce, starting out in the workforce, and you’re losing their lives. There’s a forthcoming research from the Road Safety Coalition Uganda looking at the loss of GDP from road traffic injuries. In 2017, your government reported 3,500 deaths. The WHO estimated it was double that at about 6,000. It has gone up. In 2021, your government reported 4,159 deaths. Again, the WHO estimated it was about double that at 7,300. This is not good. This is a crisis and we need everyone working together on it,” Ms. Bavinger said.

She noted that Bloomberg Philanthropies will be working over these next two years with KCCA and with the government of Uganda to institutionalize data collection and the surveillance of road traffic injuries and deaths to improve its accuracy.

Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies hands a copy of the Kampala Summary Status Report on Road Safety Risk Factors to KCCA to MPs. Makerere University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, KCCA, Vital Strategies launch of Status Summary Report 2023; Road Risk Factors for Kampala, Uganda, 16th January 2024, Hotel Africana, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.
Becky Bavinger, from the public health area of Bloomberg Philanthropies hands a copy of the Kampala Summary Status Report on Road Safety Risk Factors to KCCA to MPs.

“These data are critical to forming your decision making. I just want to conclude by saying congratulations to Makerere University, to Johns Hopkins University, but ultimately to KCCA for launching this report, for conducting this research and this is not easy research to conduct. To the stakeholders, use these data. Please, please do not go home and put this report on your shelf. Look through it. Talk to the journalist. Get the media to write stories about this, let everyone know what is happening,” said Bavinger. 

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Digital Mobile Technologies to Study Tuberculosis: A Multi-Discplinary Program

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An aerial view of the Makerere University School of Public Health construction site on the Main Campus. To the Right is the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI) and in the background are Dag Hammaskjold Hall (Green roof) and University Hall (Brown tiles).

A TRAINING PROGRAM SPONSORED BY FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, USA

INFORMATIONAL SESSION

Makerere University School of Public Health under D43 multi-disciplinary training program in digital mobile technologies to study tuberculosis that was recently funded by the NIH, through the University of Georgia (UGA) has an opportunity for funding of a masters’ research thesis. This is available to two (02) first year students of the Graduate programmes offered at Makerere University who have progressed to concept proposal development stage of their graduate program. These should be in good academic standing and have or are about to complete year 1 in Academic Year 2023/24. The support will start at the beginning of Academic Year 2024/25, i.e., end of August 2024 when the students are starting their year 2.  Students of geography and or digital health related courses are encouraged to apply, females too.  Students will be provided with secondary data to address the following, or similar, issues relating to tuberculosis (TB):

  1. Characterizing mobility patterns between urban and rural areas of Uganda using archived cell-phone (CDR) metadata
  2. Correlation between self-reported geolocated mobility patterns of TB patients and CDR data
  3. Differences in mobility patterns of TB patient’s pre-diagnosis and post-diagnosis
  4. Gender differences and relationship between IGRA and TST in a prospective cohort
  5. Patterns of change in serial IGRA test results by sex, age, HIV status
  6. Temporal changes in contact, mobility and geographic networks in TB converters and non-converters
  7. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) of social contacts and location patterns of movement by residents at risk for TB infection

Interested students are encouraged to attend an information session on Wednesday 17th July 2024 at MakSPH Annex Kololo where details about the research questions and funding opportunity will be provided to prospective applicants. Prospective applicants will be required to work with their mentors and training grant personnel to develop a 2-5-page concept that will be vetted for possible funding by training faculty of the training program.

Interested students should register their attendance with the training Coordinator, Mr Ivan Mutyaba by sending an email expressing interest in attending the session to imutyaba@musph.ac.ug by close of business on Thursday, 11th July 2024.

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METS Newsletter June 2024

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Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) Dean, Prof Rhoda Wanyenze (Left), MoH Director General, Dr. Henry Mwebesa (Right) and other stakeholders join Dr. Amy Boore (2nd Right) to cut cake at her farewell event. Golden Tulip Hotel, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.

The Monitoring and Evaluation Technical Support (METS) Program is a 5-year CDC-supported collaboration of Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH), the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) and Health Information Systems Program (HISP Uganda).

Highlights of the METS June 2024 Newsletter

  • Tracking Trends in HIV Outcomes: The Implementation of HIV Case-Based Surveillance
    • METS in partnership with the Ministry of Health (MoH) and various implementing partners, is spearheading the HIV Case-Based Surveillance (CBS) initiative across Uganda. By February 2024, CBS had been activated in 504 health facilities, with 349 sites (69%) actively transmitting data.
    • Trends of New HIV Diagnosis: An analysis trends over a 20-year period (2000-2022) revealed an increase in new HIV diagnosis over time, peaking in 2014 and 2018, before starting to decline. Diagnoses among females consistently exceeded those among males each year.
    • Case-Based Surveillance (CBS) complimenting other HIV surveillance programs: CBS provides valuable insights into infection patterns and highlights the need for targeted interventions, particularly among females. Next steps include continued scale up of CBS implementation to reach 80% of ART sites; improving data transmission from facility to the national repository to achieve at least 90% of the CBS activated sites; and strengthening data analytics and use of the data for program improvement.
  • Enhancing HIV Prevention Data Collection Through Bootcamps
    • METS in collaboration with HISP Uganda held a workshop in Mbarara to update the Health Management Information System (HMIS) tools for PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) in the HIV Prevention Tracker. The workshop focused on digitizing paper forms to efficiently collect data on key and priority populations.
  • Electronic Medical Records (EMR) upgrades in Eastern Uganda
    • The two-week activity kicked off with a week-long training session at Northeast Villa in Kumi focused on the enhancements of UgandaEMR+, including improved point-of-care (POC) functionalities and data visualization techniques.
    • The initiative successfully trained over 15 AIDS Information Centre (AIC) staff members, including M&E leads, IT personnel, data officers, and M&E managers, in the practical use of UgandaEMR+. Additionally, the two facilities, Ochero HCIII and Kapelebyong HCIV, were upgraded and their staff trained on the new system.
  • Tribute to Dr. Joshua Musinguzi (9/09/1963 – 7/06/2024)
    • Dr. Joshua Musinguzi’s efforts to minimize HIV incidence and death strategically focused on translating knowledge into policies and actions, which has helped Uganda manage the HIV epidemic.
  • Gallery
    • Bidding farewell to Dr. Amy Boore, Program Director, Division of Global Health Protection – CDC
    • Analysing the UgandaEMR Clinical Laboratory Module
    • UgandaEMR+ training for USAID SITES
    • Training for clinicians at Ruharo Mission Hospital on SARI and ILI
    • HIV Treatment Services (HTS) Implementers Meeting

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Job Opportunity at MakSBSREC: Assistant Administrative Officer

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The Davies Lecture Theatre (Right), School of Biomedical Sciences (Blue) and other buildings at the College of Health Sciences (CHS), Mulago Campus, Makerere University, Kampala Uganda, East Africa.

Makerere University is pleased to announce a vacancy for the position of Assistant Administrative Officer (REC Administrator) within the School of Biomedical Sciences Research Ethics Committee (MakSBSREC). This is an excellent opportunity for qualified individuals to contribute to the ethical oversight of research involving human participants.

Position Details:

  • Job Title: Assistant Administrative Officer (REC Administrator) – MakSBSREC
  • Reports to: Chairperson MakSBSREC
  • Engagement: Full-time
  • Duration: 1 Year, renewable upon satisfactory performance
  • Duty Station: Kampala

Qualifications, Desired Skills, and Experience:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Social Sciences and Humanities, Medicine and Surgery, Ethics and Human Rights, or any related field.
  • Master’s degree in Bioethics (an added advantage).
  • Up-to-date training in Human Subject Protection or Good Clinical Practice.
  • Proficiency in English (both spoken and written).
  • Prior experience in regulatory work in research studies or projects.
  • Excellent communication, organizational, and interpersonal skills.
  • Ability to work independently with minimal supervision and meet deadlines.

How to Apply:

Qualified and interested candidates are invited to submit a soft copy of their application documents and a motivation letter to deansbs.chs@mak.ac.ug with the subject line “Application for the position of Assistant Administrative Officer (REC Administrator)”. Address your application to the Dean, School of Biomedical Sciences.

Deadline for submission: July 2, 2024, by 5:00 pm Ugandan time.

Please provide a reliable 24-hour phone contact. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted for interviews.

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